In Audre’s Footsteps: Feel the Love

My amazing students sent me the most beautiful video showing me lots of love and sharing their enthusiasm for In Audre’s Footsteps! I cried for so long, and I am so full of gratitude, excitement, love, and joy! Thank you and lots of love to each and every one of them (in order of appearance): Jazlyn Tate Andrews (2015 #FemGeniusesinBerlin and In Audre’s Footsteps co-author), Niyat Ogbazghi, Alejandra Hernandez (2016 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Malone DeYoung, Atiya Harvey (Fall 2017 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Mae Eskenazi (2016 #FemGeniusesinBerlin and In Audre’s Footsteps‘ audiovisual engineer), Sakina Bhatti, Njeri Summey, Kali Place, Cheanna Gavin (2016 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Lexi Davis, Nan Elpers, Emma Martin, Eileen Huang (2019 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Kay Adams (Fall 2017 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Maya Patel, Hailey Corkery (2017 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Avia Hailey (2019 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Tess Gattuso, Ivy Wappler (2016 #FemGeniusesinBerlin), Lindumuzi Jabu Ndlovu, Judy Fisher, Christie Ma (organizer of this beautiful offering), Salem Tewelde, and Jade Frost (2015 #FemGeniusesinBerlin and In Audre’s Footsteps copyeditor). Words can’t express my appreciation, but I feel it deeply in all of my being!

 

 

I also want to sincerely thank each and every person who purchased a copy of In Audre’s Footsteps and allowed us to share these amazing, supportive photographs! Y’all are the real MVPs!

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The Highlights | Witnessed | The Co-Authors#FemGeniusesinBerlin | The Dedication | The Acknowledgements | The Preface | The Foreword | The Introduction | Chapter One | Chapter Two | Chapter Three | Chapter Four | Chapter Five | Chapter Six | Chapter Seven | The Afterword | The Contributors | The Blurbs | Buy the Book | Events | Book Dr. Lewis

STEMinist

STEMinist (Cover)

Created by Emily McBride (Editor), Claire Hotaling (Editorial Assistant), Atiya Harvey (Journalist), Rani Corak (Journalist), and Kathryn Chase (Graphic Designer)

“We at STEMinist see you as fully capable young womxn, integral to a necessary transformation of the STEM disciplines. As Sandra Harding notes, we, as feminists, ‘have not yet given adequate attention to envisioning truly emancipatory knowledge-seeking.’ In other words, the purpose of the STEMinist mag is to encourage you not only to seek knowledge that historically has not been available to you, but to take charge of the way knowledge, and science, is produced and applied. You have so much power in shaping yourselves and the world you want to live in, and we at STEMinist want you to never forget it!”
—Emily McBride, Editor

Click here to read STEMinist!

STEMinist (ToC)

 

Some Final Thoughts on the Block 4 2017 #FemGeniusesinBerlin

Kai (Dylan)

Photo Credit: Dylan Compton

This podcast—led and produced by Kai Mesman-Hallman—provides some final reflections on the Block 4 2017 section of Hidden Spaces, Hidden Narratives: Intersectionality Studies in Berlin with Professor Heidi R. Lewis. Throughout the block, the #FemGeniusesinBerlin have taken walking tours, visited museums and cultural centers, and met with activists and artists in the city to conduct situated examinations of how the identities of marginalized people and communities in Germany (especially in Berlin)—such as Black Germans, Turkish Germans, migrants, refugees, victims of Neo-Nazi terrorism and police brutality, and LGBTQI communities—are constructed, particularly how these constructions are dependent on racism, heterosexism, colonialism, imperialism, and other forms of oppression. Additionally, we examined how these communities resist, reject, revise, and reproduce these narratives as they construct their own subjectivities.

Kai is a junior at Colorado College majoring in Psychology, and is originally from San Diego, CA. She is especially interested in consciousness and the ways our brains’ processing and collecting information can shape our beliefs and thoughts. She spends her free time with her dog and watching conspiracy theory videos.

Joining Kai in her discussion are Uma Scharf—a Baltimore, MD native and junior at Colorado College majoring in Neuroscience, and Drew Ceglinski—a Bath, ME native and junior at Colorado College majoring in Geology.

 

Block 4 2017 FemGeniuses in Berlin Podcast Index:
Click here to view a slideshow, and follow us on Instagram and Twitter to see even more pictures and videos!

Jewish History & Culture Walking Tour” by Maggie Mehlman
Das Verbogene Museum” by Anna Balaguer
Interkulturelles Frauenzentrum S.U.S.I.” by Bridget O’Neill
Women’s Perspective Walking Tour” by Caroline Olin
Jüdisches Museum Berlin” by Britta Lam
Jewish AntiFa Berlin” by Dylan Compton
Berliner Unterwelten” by Atiya Harvey
BlackBox Cold War Exhibition” by Karl Hirt
Generation ADEFRA” by Maya Littlejohn
Queer Berlin Walking Tour” by Judy Fisher
Queer City: Stories from São Paulo” by D. Adams
A Right to Mourn; A Right to Monument” by Maddie Sorensen
The Spirit of 1968 Walking Tour” by Anabel Simotas
Reframing Worlds: Mobilität und Gender aus Postkolonial Feministischer Perspektive” by Elsa Godtfredsen
Queer@School” by Drew Ceglinski
RomaniPhen: Rromnja Archiv” by Kendall Stoetzer
Reflections on the Asian Diaspora in Germany” by Uma Scharf
Street Art Workshop & Tour” by Wynter Scott

To read and/or listen to the finales and view the indices and slideshows for previous FemGeniuses in Berlin, click here

A Right to Mourn; A Right to Monument

Maddie (Elsa)

Photo Credit: Elsa Godtfredsen

This podcast—led and produced by Maddie Sorensen—examines “A Right to Mourn; A Right to Monument,” an installation by Nathalie Anguezomo Mba Bikoro featured at Ballhaus Naunynstraße. According to the Ballhaus website, “Nathalie Anguezomo Mba Bikoro presents an installation at Ballhaus Naunynstraße: a mobile garden plantation and a satellite tower make up the foundation pillars of this special space of commemoration, growth and healing. Visitors are invited to complete the artist’s pre-produced voice archive by recording their own contributions as sound testimonies and sharing their demands for a right to a monument.” Further, “The project is part of a process to commemorate anti-colonial movements between Germany and Africa. Here the demand for reparations is addressed in the context of technology transfer: sound recordings and transmissions provide the basis for a decolonial archive intended as a performative gesture for a monument to all those that were erased. Considering the historical traces of Germany’s involvement in colonial systems—particularly through accessing botanical sciences and cultural industries—the monument is intended to challenge our constructs of memory: using mythologies to inspire a moment of healing and repair.”

Picture I

Photo Credit: Maddie Sorensen

Maddie Sorensen is a junior Organismal Biology and Ecology major at Colorado College from outside of Chicago. She has always wanted to dive deeper into German history, learn another language, and explore more of Europe, so she found this to be the perfect opportunity for the semester. When she is not reading a science textbook or planning her next adventure, she can be found playing tennis, fishing, biking, skiing and baking lots of sweets.

Picture III

Photo Credit: Maddie Sorensen

Joining Maddie in her discussion are Maggie Mehlmana junior Math major from Denver, CO, and Atiya Harvey—a senior Feminist and Gender Studies major from Washington, D.C.

NOTE: The photo credit for the featured image also belongs to Maddie Sorensen.

 

Generation ADEFRA

Littlejohn

Photo Credit: Maya Littlejohn

This podcast—led and produced by Maya Littlejohn—examines our session with Peggy Piesche, Maisha Eggers, and Katja Kinder of Generation ADEFRA. In the mid-1980s, a group of Black women activists were brought together in Berlin by self-described “Black lesbian mother warrior poet” Audre Lorde (1934-1992) and inspired to found the initiative ADEFRA: Black Women in Germany. Additionally, historian and founding member Katharina Oguntoye “points to the complexity of the task of not only bringing together previously relatively isolated Black women in Germany with their sometimes very differently developed vital interests, but also to keep them together in the long run.”

Picture I

Photo Credit: Maya Littlejohn

Maya Littlejohn is a junior at Colorado College majoring in Race, Ethnicity, and Migration Studies and minoring in Political Science. She’s originally from Brooklyn, New York. During her free time, Maya is involved in the President’s Council and works for Attorney Jarrett Adams at the Innocence Project. On her good days, you’re likely to find herin a sunny spot sketching and binge watching MSNBC.

Picture II

Photo Credit: Maya Littlejohn

Joining Maya in her discussion are D. Adams—a Memphis, TN native and junior at Colorado College majoring in Race, Ethnicity, and Migration Studies, and Atiya Harvey—a Washington, DC native and a senior at Colorado College majoring in Feminist and Gender Studies.

NOTE: The featured image photo credit also belongs to Maya Littlejohn.

 

CORRECTION: Farbe bekennen: Afro-deutsche Frauen auf den Spuren ihrer Geschichte (Showing Our Colors: Afro-German Women Speak Out) was co-edited by Katharina Oguntoye, May (Opitz) Ayim, and Dagmar Schultz.