Calling senior and junior FGS majors and minors!!!

We are strongly encouraging participation from junior and senior Feminist and Gender studies majors and minors in upcoming focus groups conducted by Triota cabinet and sponsored by the Feminist and Gender Studies department. We have been entrusted to create and facilitate a focus group structure that would provide faculty with a richer account of Feminist and Gender Studies student experiences and a better understanding of the effects of their labor and decision-making in creating curriculum, planning events, supporting students amongst other things.The focus groups we are facilitating this Spring will include only junior and senior Feminist and Gender Studies majors and minors.

Each class (juniors and seniors) will have one date option per block (Block 6 and Block 7). So please look at the dates carefully and contact any triota cabinet member below for access to the survey link if you didn’t already receive an email. We need this information ASAP so please fill out the survey as soon as possible or email us with any questions. Location TBD. Lunch will be provided!!!

Please see the dates and times below and click on the survey link to select a spot. Please be sure to choose the right date for your year. There are only TWO dates per class and we are limiting the spots so that we can ensure a more even number in each group, so select the date you want ASAP to ensure your spot. .

Junior Dates (Junior majors and minors select one):

Friday March 6                  12:30-2:30

Wednesday March 25         12:30-2:30

 

Senior Dates (Senior majors and minors select one):

Monday March 2               12:30-2:30

Wednesday April 1            12:30-2:30

 

Again, feel free to reach out to any of us if you have questions or concerns.

Zivia Berkowitz ‘21 (Administrator) z_berkowitz@coloradocollege.edu

Mekael Daniel ‘20 (Vice President) m_daniel@coloradocollege.edu

Judy Fisher ‘20 (President)j_fisher@coloradocollege.edu

New Year, New Monthly Rag Content Creators

Please join me in welcoming Sage Reynolds and Anya Quesnel as our new content creators!

 

 

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My name is Sage Reynolds—transferred to CC this year, originally from Colorado, and thrilled to be one of the Content Creators for The Monthly Rag! I am currently a sophomore (soon to be declared) Feminist and Gender Studies Major. I am passionate about reproductive justice and would love to do a collaborative project with the local Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood to create more inclusive opportunities around sex Education on campus. Eager to collaborate, listen, and create, I can’t wait to work with The Monthly Rag team.

 

 

 

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My name is Anya Quesnel and I’m a first-year student hailing from Trinidad and Tobago. I want to help make the Monthly Rag a critical, creative platform for the discussion of relevant topics to Feminist and Gender Studies which go beyond the immediate campus and United States context. I hope to see this publication grow into a space for a wide range of feminist voices to be heard and to provide our community with the monthly dose of FemGen realness it needs.

Two feminist icons of mine are Shivanee Ramlochan and Attilah Springer

“Palestine in the Sky: Visionary Aesthetics of Flight, Freedom, and Fantasy on the Frontiers of U.S. Forever War” By Dr. Ronak Kapadia

 

“Palestine(s) in the Sky: Visionary Aesthetics of Flight, Freedom, and Fantasy on the Frontiers of U.S Forever War,” by Dr. Ronak Kapadia

Friday March 6th, 5 PM

FAC Museum Education Studio

Sponsored by Feminist and Gender Studies, the Mellon Foundation, the Fine Arts Center, and Students for Justice in Palestine

 

This talk advances queer, feminist, decolonial, diasporic, and indigenous modes of thinking about the futures of Palestine. It will argue that a contrapuntal queer feminist analysis of visionary aesthetics in the work of London-based Palestinian visual artist Larissa Sansour provides an alternate perceptual regime through which to understand the “facts-on-the-ground” of contemporary US/Israeli security policing and warfare. By closely reading her science fiction film trilogy series as a form of sensuous knowledge and critique, this talk will question what architecture, outer space, and Arab futurisms together might yield for thinking Palestinian sovereignty otherwise. Bringing together scholarship on the affective, legal, and spatial dimensions of both contemporary Israeli security regimes and the Palestinian struggle for liberation with critical works in Arab/American studies, Black studies, Native studies, and queer studies, this paper further identifies fugitive alliances and radical forms of insurgent political consciousness between Palestine and Indigenous/Native futurisms and Afrofuturisms in the US/North America. In so doing, this research not only contributes to the transnationalization of American studies but also probes the field’s outer-planetary and cosmic dimensions too.

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Dr. Kapadia is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and affiliated faculty in Art History, Global Asian Studies, and Museum & Exhibition Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  He is the author of Insurgent Aesthetics: Security and the Queer Life of the Forever War (Duke University Press, 2019) which theorizes the queer world-making potential of contemporary art and aesthetics in the ongoing context of US war and empire in the Greater Middle East. His broader research and teaching fields include critical ethnic studies; race radical and transnational feminisms; queer of color critique; Arab, Muslim, and South Asian diasporas; national security and surveillance; critical prison and military studies; visual and performance studies; affect and new materialisms; and US Empire.

 

Colonialism in Transit, A Teach-in

The Feminist and Gender Studies Department presents “Colonialism in Transit, A Teach-In” with Hailey Corkery, Oscar Glassman, and Ramah Aleryan on Friday November 8, 2019 from 4-5:30 at Sacred Grounds.

 

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Hailey Corkery’s teach-in focuses on the political implications of North American birthright trips to Israel. It explores these consequences by examining the curriculum of as well as the motivations and funding behind birthright. The ultimate goal of this teach-in is to foster productive discussion amongst the Colorado College student body about how birthright is not, as many believe, “just a free trip” and how we as a community can combat its harmful ramifications.

 

 

In the U.S., allegations of antisemitism have become one major way in which Muslim or/and Arab public figures are vilified and produced as threatening and hateful. In Oscar Glassman’s teach-in he will trace a brief history of the term focusing on its relation to other forms of racism, Zionism, and the state of Israel. What political work does this discourse on the “new antisemitism” do? How does it utilize antiracist language to racialize others? At a time when colonial white nationalism, including antisemitism, is swelling once again in the U.S. and Palestinian lives continue to be made less livable while Palestinian deaths are deemed ungrievable, Jews must become clearer on what antisemitism is and what “never again” means.

 

 

Ramah Aleryan is looking at experiences of displacement and the process of belonging and re-belonging for Syrians, on the refugee statues, in the Norweigan and the Lebanese contexts. How does different states approach “integration”? What does “integration” mean for postcolonial subjects both in the Middle East and in European Contexts? As bombs falling from Russian and Turkish warcraft on Syria currently, the topic is more relevant than ever. Both the conflict and the treatment of displaced individuals are the continuation of colonization and rendering the lives of people of color and people from the global south disposable.