The New Kids

The New Kids Cover

Created by Lindumuzi “Jabu” Ndlovu (Editor), Samuel Vang (Editorial Assistant), Chloe Dillon (Journalist), Oscar Glassman (Journalist), and Emily Erickson (Graphic Designer)

“As educators and guardians, we want you to read this magazine with your child […] Ultimately, The New Kids is a collaborative magazine with questions, conversations, symbols and captivating artwork. We hope that the landscape we created encourages conversation—raising a young theorist is not only a space of growth and questioning, but healing for everyone.”
—Lindumuzi “Jabu” Ndlovu

Click here to read The New Kids!

The New Kids ToC

SPLIT

Split Cover

Created by Laura Ayre (Editor), Madi Doerre (Journalist), Cassis Schafer (Journalist), and Avia Hailey (Graphic Designer)

“Our intention is to provide a glimpse of women in marriage from a transnational feminist standpoint […] Among other things, our primary vision at SPLIT is to encourage our readers to question which institutions they are conditioned to participate in and for what reasons those institutions are deemed socially legitimate. We wish you good luck in your journey going forward, and we hope that you find yourselves as curious and inspired as we were when creating this publication.”
—Laura Ayre, Editor

Click here to read SPLIT!

Split ToC

Sexplorations

Sexplorations Cover

Created by Zivia Berkowitz (Editor), Skylar Owens (Editorial Assistant), Hailey Corkery (Journalist), Fran Grandonico (Journalist), and Mekael Daniel (Graphic Designer)

“Through a feminist lens, Sexplorations takes a journalistic approach to engaging with conversations surrounding sex and promoting consent-oriented forms of pleasure and intimacy […] If you have been sexually active for years or are just beginning your sexual journey, looking for ways to enhance your sex life or want to be informed, Sexplorations is for you.”
—Zivia Berkowitz, Editor

Click here to read Sexplorations!

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MUSIQ+

Musiq+ Cover

Created by Miles Marshall (Editor), Mia Solberg (Editorial Assistant), Emma Caligor (Journalist), Kat Spencer (Journalist), and Eileen Huang (Graphic Designer)

“We recognize the radical potentiality of queerness. What better place to start these movements than music, an incredibly accessible art form that carries meaning and connects people? I love queerness, and I love music that represents queerness in all its rainbow glory. I, and the rest of the MUSIQ+ team, couldn’t be more excited for you to dive into the world of queer music. You’re here, and whether or not you’re queer, welcome to MUSIQ+!”
—Miles Marshall, Editor

Click here to read MUSIQ+! Also, scroll down for audio footage of the team’s fascinating interview with Selena the Chapel!

Musiq+ ToC

Reproducing Patriarchal Power Structures in the Name of Feminism

By Katie Trinh

Dr. Imani Perry believes that feminists need to grapple with the complex structure of the patriarchy. Patriarchy includes the exclusion and suffering of women due to the domination of men. She claims that legal and economic relations in society are the foundation of patriarchy. There are three components that define patriarchy in the past and present: property holding men, legal personhood, and the privilege to appeal to the sovereign authority. Legal personhood refers to the fact that an individual is recognized as a right-bearing human being. One of Dr. Imani Perry’s main points is that women only have access to these benefits when they are attached to a patriarch. The system of the patriarchy is written into the law. Every aspect of feminist theory involves dismantling the patriarchy, and the patriarchy demonstrates how legal and economic institutions hold the most power and privilege. 

Perry also discusses how although entrepreneurial women signify female progress, these women are perceived to be successful because of their “masculine” traits. There is a narrative that men fail professionally or economically because of the economic success of women. According to Perry, feminism is a complicated concept that many people do not grasp. Many people believe that feminism means having women replace men as the dominating gender. However, Perry takes the stance that women, especially feminists, should not try to dominate men; instead, feminists should take on ethical positions that are based on their understanding of oppression. 

One of Perry’s main points is that patriarchy manifests as an entitlement that needs to be protected. She says that sexual allegations against men in power demonstrate how patriarchy is an entitlement. Many people argue that sexual allegations against men in power will “ruin their lives,” implying that their patriarchy and the privilege that comes with it needs to be protected. Perry also notes that any type of privilege acts as an entitlement for people. She provides the example of a white woman who accused a young black boy of groping her. Because the woman had the privilege of being white, she felt as though she was entitled to accuse a young black boy of sexual misconduct. Perry argues that we need to “read the layers” and look at how other factors besides gender, such as race, can contribute to relations in power. Perry’s point about adopting a language of intersectionality directly connects to Feminist and Gender Studies because this study revolves around the changing relationships between power and different factors of identity. 

Overall, Perry asks us to recognize our own positions of privilege. She acknowledges that none of us have “clean hands.” Everyone is at a certain position of privilege at the expense of oppressed and marginalized people. Sill, Perry asks everyone to examine how their position of privilege can play a role in affecting change. To Perry, feminism means looking closer at how economic and legal institutions enforce this patriarchal system, and how we must take ethical positions to address these systems of oppression.