Pizza Face

Pizza Face (Cover)

Created by Malone DeYoung (Editor), Jules Olliff (Editorial Assistant), Susanna Penfield (Journalist), Rachel Mintz (Journalist), and Hailey Schramm (Graphic Designer) in Block 6 2018

“I’d like to welcome you to the first issue of Pizza Face, a magazine designed as a space for you, youth of all gender identities, to learn, experiment, and come together in the process of shaping your identity in this big and sometimes scary world! Many years ago, a band called Bikini Kill said that “doing/reading/seeing/hearing cool things that validate and challenge us can help us gain strength and a sense of community.” They said these cool things help us figure out how to be happy in the world, and we agree! We hope Pizza Face can show you some cool things that will both encourage and challenge you (and that are also just plain fun)!”
—Malone DeYoung, Editor

Click here to read Pizza Face!

Pizza Face (ToC)

Straight Best Friend: Inverting G.B.F.’s Failed Attempt at a Political Statement

original-print“The presentation of this fairy-tale ending, where everyone lives happily ever after, neglects to address the conflict between the three girls and their horrific treatment of Tanner. This quick and sloppy resolution trivializes the abuse Tanner faces and thus normalizes gay submission to those in dominant social roles.”
—Susanna Penfield, Jules Olliff, Jess Keniston, and Winston Xu (Block 4 2016)

“The color scheme of the poster, and entire movie, is itself a binary that further enforces gender and societal divisions. Despite the sparkles and pastel-tint that render the title and background slightly more effeminate, and thus more gay, the primary colors are still blue and pink. Due to its predominate size and position, the pink title G.B.F. fills the upper half of the poster while the bottom is predominantly blue. This contrast points to the constructs society has imposed on male-female relationships and the separation that is maintained between behaviors of the two sexes.”

“Although the trailer for G.B.F is an attempt to satirize the behavior of individuals who sensationalize sexuality, the trailer devotes little time to showing Tanner’s plight, treating him like a minor character. The trailer’s focus on the other characters’ struggles detracts from Tanner’s own journey. The trailer reiterates several times how having a G.B.F is beneficial to one’s social status. ”

sbf“The difference lies in the character’s sexuality as Tanner has now “come out” as straight in a society that has embraced queer to be the status quo, meaning that the three depicted women are all meant to be homosexual. This, however, is not evident in the revised print as each character is presented as confident and autonomous, firmly grounded and perpendicular to the surface they stand on regardless of gender or sexual orientation.”

“By creating a world where queer women possess the mainstream narrative, we lend voices to individuals that are typically overlooked by the media. This, in turn, highlights the widely accepted notion that heterosexual men naturally occupy a dominant space. This choice counters the heterosexual norm, while pointing out the ridiculousness of normalized shock and tokenization that are common reactions to homosexuality.”